Spengler

July 16th, 2009  |  Published in Quotes

The life of most men is driven by want, sustained by his own strength, supplying the needs of the day through his own labor; a great deal of exertion, constant turmoil, a great deal of hardship; no care for the morrow, not a moment to spare for reflection. Finally, as the metaphysical element, some crass superstition provided by the Church.

This constitutes the life of millions of men. They know only for the purposes of their present wants: they give no thought to the coherence of their existence, not to speak of existence itself: to a certain extend they exist without really being aware of it.

But the philosopher stands in wonder before existence itself and makes of it his problem.

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